May 25, 2024

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Exercise in the Afternoon for Improved Type 2 Diabetes Management

Discover the transformative potential of integrating exercise into your daily routine, with a focus on the afternoon hours, in effectively managing Type 2 Diabetes. In this article, we provide an insightful exploration into the world of fitness backed by emerging scientific evidence.

The Ongoing Battle Against Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes is a burgeoning global health concern. This metabolic disorder compromises your body’s ability to regulate blood sugar. Tackling it head-on requires an informed, multifaceted approach.

The Cornerstone: Exercise and Its Significance

Rejuvenating Your Body’s Dynamics

Exercise is a cornerstone in the management of Type 2 Diabetes. Engaging your muscles through physical activity enhances insulin sensitivity and aids in stabilizing blood glucose levels. This combination is essential in keeping Type 2 Diabetes in check.

Optimal Timing: The Afternoon Advantage

Aligning with Your Body’s Clock

Our bodies are governed by internal clocks known as circadian rhythms, which dictate various physiological processes. Engaging in physical activity during the afternoon appears to align seamlessly with these rhythms, yielding amplified benefits.

The Afternoon Surge in Insulin Sensitivity

Exercising in the afternoon has been associated with a surge in insulin sensitivity compared to morning workouts. Enhanced insulin sensitivity is invaluable as it allows your cells to utilize glucose more efficiently, keeping blood sugar levels balanced.

Crafting a Sustainable Afternoon Exercise Routine

Diverse Workouts for Holistic Benefits

A well-rounded exercise routine incorporating cardiovascular activities such as brisk walking or swimming, alongside resistance training, is advisable. These exercises impact blood glucose levels and contribute to overall physical and mental well-being.

Consistency is Key

Developing a sustainable exercise routine is vital. Dedicate time daily for physical activity, or at least most days of the week.

Stay Informed and Adapt

It’s imperative to regularly monitor your blood sugar levels and consult your healthcare provider to make necessary adjustments to your exercise regimen. This ensures a tailored approach that caters to your body’s specific needs.

Being Cautious: Safety Measures

Consult your healthcare professional before initiating any new exercise regimen. It’s prudent to take necessary precautions to avoid complications, especially if you’re dealing with a chronic condition like Type 2 Diabetes.

Embrace the Afternoon: A Catalyst for Change

Incorporating afternoon exercise into your daily routine can be a catalyst for positive change in managing Type 2 Diabetes. Empowered with this knowledge, let’s seize the afternoon, elevating our health and lives.

Your Roadmap to Success

As you embark on this transformative journey, remember that knowledge, consistency, and a positive mindset are your most potent allies. The dedicated afternoon exercise and your unwavering commitment can foster a fulfilling and instrumental lifestyle in combating Type 2 Diabetes.

Engaging with Professionals for Tailored Guidance

Engaging with healthcare professionals is highly beneficial for a personalized approach. They can provide insights and recommendations tailored to your unique needs. Furthermore, diabeteslifebalance.com offers a plethora of resources to support your journey.

Fostering a Community of Like-minded Individuals

Sharing experiences and exchanging information with others taking steps to manage Type 2 Diabetes can be immensely rewarding. Being part of a community can offer the encouragement and motivation necessary to remain steadfast in your goals.

Empowerment Through Education

Staying informed about the latest developments in Type 2 Diabetes management is crucial. With reliable information at your fingertips, you can make more informed decisions that positively impact your health.

The Takeaway: Seizing the Afternoon for A Brighter Tomorrow

Type 2 Diabetes need not be an insurmountable challenge. Through strategic incorporation of afternoon exercise, coupled with an informed and dedicated approach, you have the tools to impact your health positively.

Take the reins and harness the transformative potential of afternoon exercise. Embrace the synergy of movement and timing in not just managing but truly living life beyond the constraints of Type 2 Diabetes.

References:

American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes—2014. Diabetes Care. 2014;37(Suppl 1):S14-S80.

Colberg SR, et al. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes: The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association: joint position statement. Diabetes Care. 2010;33(12):e147-e167.

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only and should not be considered medical advice. Always consult with a healthcare professional before making any changes to your exercise routine or managing a health condition like Type 2 Diabetes.

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Understanding the Impact of Stigma and Fear on Healthcare Appointments for People Living with Diabetes

Living with diabetes can present various challenges, from managing blood sugar levels to making lifestyle adjustments. However, a recent report from Diabetes UK has shed light on a concerning issue – approximately 50% of people with diabetes have missed healthcare appointments due to stigma and fear. This article will delve into the reasons behind this phenomenon, its implications for diabetes management, and potential strategies to address the issue.

The Stigma Surrounding Diabetes

What is Stigma?

Stigma refers to the negative attitudes and beliefs that society holds towards certain conditions or groups of people. Unfortunately, diabetes is not exempt from this social stigma. Individuals living with diabetes may face judgment, stereotypes, and discrimination due to misconceptions about the condition.

The Impact of Stigma

Stigma can have a profound impact on the lives of people with diabetes. It can lead to feelings of shame, embarrassment, and self-blame, making it challenging for individuals to seek appropriate healthcare. Fear of being labeled, judged, or misunderstood may prevent them from attending crucial medical appointments, which is essential for managing their condition effectively.

Fear and Healthcare Avoidance

Fear of Judgment and Misunderstanding

Many individuals with diabetes experience fear when it comes to healthcare appointments. They worry about being judged or misunderstood by healthcare professionals due to misconceptions about the condition. This fear can be particularly pronounced when individuals have faced previous negative experiences or encounters with healthcare providers.

Emotional and Psychological Factors

The fear of healthcare appointments can be rooted in emotional and psychological factors. Some individuals may feel overwhelmed by the burden of managing their condition and fear hearing bad news or being reminded of their health challenges. These anxieties can contribute to avoidance behavior and a reluctance to engage with healthcare services.

Practical Barriers

In addition to emotional factors, practical barriers can contribute to missed healthcare appointments. Factors such as transportation issues, financial constraints, or scheduling conflicts may make it difficult for individuals to attend their appointments, leading to further avoidance.

Implications for Diabetes Management

Poor Glycemic Control

Missed healthcare appointments can have significant consequences for diabetes management. Regular check-ups and monitoring are crucial for maintaining optimal glycemic control. When individuals avoid these appointments, they may struggle to adjust their treatment plans, leading to suboptimal blood sugar management and an increased risk of complications.

Delayed Intervention and Treatment

Timely intervention is essential for preventing complications and managing diabetes effectively. When individuals miss healthcare appointments, potential health concerns or complications may go undetected, leading to necessary treatment and interventions delays.

Psychological and Emotional Well-being

Stigma and fear can also take a toll on the psychological and emotional well-being of individuals with diabetes. Avoiding healthcare appointments can exacerbate anxiety and stress, potentially leading to increased feelings of isolation and depression. By addressing the underlying factors contributing to missed appointments, we can support the overall well-being of individuals living with diabetes.

Addressing Stigma and Fear: Strategies for Change

Raising Awareness and Education

One of the key strategies for combating stigma and fear surrounding diabetes is through education and awareness campaigns. By dispelling myths and providing accurate information about the condition, we can reduce the misconceptions contributing to stigma. Additionally, educating healthcare professionals about the impact of stigma and how to create a supportive environment can enhance the overall patient experience.

Creating Supportive Environments

Healthcare settings play a crucial role in fostering a supportive and inclusive environment for individuals with diabetes. Implementing patient-centered care approaches, where individuals feel respected, heard, and understood, can help alleviate fears and reduce stigma. This can be achieved through healthcare provider training programs that emphasize empathy, cultural sensitivity, and practical communication skills.

Peer Support and Community Engagement

Connecting individuals with diabetes to peer support groups and community resources can be instrumental in addressing feelings of isolation and building a sense of belonging. Peer support offers a safe space for individuals to share experiences, seek guidance, and receive emotional support from those who can relate to their challenges. Community engagement initiatives, such as diabetes awareness events and workshops, can also foster a sense of empowerment and reduce the stigma associated with the condition.

Addressing Practical Barriers

To ensure individuals with diabetes can access healthcare services without unnecessary obstacles, it is essential to address practical barriers. This can involve providing transportation assistance, flexible appointment scheduling options, and exploring financial support programs for those facing financial constraints. Addressing these practical challenges makes individuals more likely to attend their healthcare appointments and receive the necessary care.

The impact of stigma and fear on healthcare appointments for people living with diabetes is a significant concern that requires attention and action. By understanding the factors contributing to missed appointments, healthcare providers, policymakers, and communities can work together to create supportive environments that promote engagement, reduce stigma, and improve diabetes management. Through education, awareness, and targeted interventions, we can empower individuals to overcome their fears, access the healthcare they need, and enhance their overall well-being.

FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)

  1. How does stigma affect individuals living with diabetes?
    Stigma can lead to feelings of shame, embarrassment, and self-blame, making it challenging for individuals to seek appropriate healthcare and manage their condition effectively.
  2. What are the consequences of missed healthcare appointments for people with diabetes?
    Missed appointments can result in poor glycemic control, delayed intervention and treatment, and negatively impact the psychological and emotional well-being of individuals with diabetes.
  3. What strategies can help address the stigma and fear surrounding diabetes?
    Raising awareness and education, creating supportive environments, promoting peer support and community engagement, and addressing practical barriers are effective strategies to combat stigma and fear.
  4. How can healthcare providers contribute to reducing stigma and fear?
    Healthcare providers can undergo training programs that emphasize empathy, cultural sensitivity, and effective communication skills to create a supportive environment for individuals with diabetes.
  5. What role does community engagement play in addressing stigma and fear?
    Community engagement initiatives, such as diabetes awareness events and peer support groups, foster a sense of empowerment, reduce isolation, and help individuals with diabetes overcome stigma and fear.
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Thriving with Diabetes: Mastering the Intricacies of Upholding Health and Wellness

Diabetes, a persistent malady, affliction, curse, whatever you want to call it, afflicts many individuals worldwide, influencing the body’s generation or utilization of insulin, an indispensable hormone that modulates blood glucose levels. To cope with diabetes, individuals must ensure they oversee their diet, physical activities, and medicine regimens, maintaining stable blood sugar levels. Nevertheless, diabetes management transcends physical well-being; it also entails navigating the emotional labyrinth of the disease. This article probes the challenges of coexisting with diabetes, its emotional repercussions, and techniques for supervising both physical and emotional health.

Decoding/Understanding What Diabetes is
Diabetes is a nuanced disorder that impacts the body’s capacity to generate or utilize insulin. It manifests primarily in two forms: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease, annihilates insulin-producing cells within the pancreas. Consequently, individuals with type 1 diabetes must control their blood glucose levels via insulin injections or pumps. Conversely, type 2 diabetes occurs when the body inadequately generates insulin or fails to utilize insulin effectively. Type 2 diabetes generally correlates with lifestyle determinants, such as subpar nutrition, obesity, and insufficient physical exertion.

The Emotional Toll of Diabetes
Living with diabetes poses challenges, and the emotional burden of the affliction frequently goes unnoticed. Diabetes may cause anxiety, despondency, exasperation (frustration), culpability )feeling of things being the fault of oneself), and mortification (dread, fear, scared). People may perceive their condition as self-inflicted due to lifestyle preferences, which can be emotionally draining. Managing diabetes can also be daunting, necessitating continuous blood glucose monitoring, adherence to medication timetables, and dietary constraints. These factors may induce burnout and frustration, underscoring the importance of addressing both physical and emotional health.

Cultivating Physical and Emotional Well-being
Diabetes management demands a multi-system approach, embracing physical and emotional well-being. Below are recommendations for coping with diabetes and fostering overall wellness:

Empower Yourself Through Knowledge
The more conversant you are with diabetes, the better prepared you are to tackle the disorder. Collaborate with healthcare experts, peruse pertinent publications, and participate in support assemblies. Comprehension is potent, and grasping the malady aids in making informed decisions regarding your health.

Refine Your Nutritional Choices
Preserving a balanced diet comprising lean proteins, vegetables, and fruits is paramount for diabetes management. Steering clear of foods laden with sugar and carbohydrates is essential. Collaborating with a nutritionist or dietitian facilitates the development of a productive meal strategy.

Integrate Consistent Exercise
Physical exertion is vital for managing diabetes, as it aids in regulating blood glucose levels and fostering overall wellness. Strive for a minimum of 30 minutes of moderate activity daily.

Supervise Blood Glucose Levels
Observing blood glucose levels constitutes a critical aspect of diabetes management. Monitoring enables comprehension of how your body reacts to nourishment, medication, and physical activity. Partner with your healthcare provider to identify the most efficacious method for tracking blood glucose levels.

Garner Support
Diabetes management may be arduous, but you need not confront it in isolation. Seek assistance from friends, family, or healthcare professionals. Participating in a support group or connecting with others battling diabetes online may prove advantageous.

Conclusion
Diabetes management necessitates a comprehensive approach that integrates physical and emotional welfare. By grasping the intricacies of diabetes, supervising diet and exercise, monitoring blood glucose levels, and enlisting support, individuals can enhance their quality of life and effectively manage diabetes.

Studies and references that support the information in this article:

“Diabetes and emotional wellbeing: Understanding the emotional impact of diabetes and tips for managing your emotions.” American Diabetes Association. (https://www.diabetes.org/diabetes/emotional-well-being)

“The emotional impact of diabetes on children and families.” International Diabetes Federation. (https://www.idf.org/e-library/emotional-impact-diabetes-children-families)

“Physical activity and type 2 diabetes: Time to look beyond the ‘exercise’ paradigm.” Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3925973/)

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Enjoy a variety of vegetables for healthy living to help your diabetes

Providing our bodies with nutrient-rich food, mainly fruits and vegetables, is essential for our health and well-being. Nevertheless, many struggle to integrate these nutritious foods into their daily meals. However, do not despair; nourishing yourself and your loved ones with healthy and appetizing dishes can be more effortless than you presume.

Venturing into the produce section of your nearby supermarket can lead to delightful culinary creations. The leading grocery chains offer a vast range of fruits and vegetables from around the globe. By experimenting with new and exceptional produce, you incorporate delightful flavors into your meals and enrich your nutritional consumption. The monotony in a healthy diet can be tiring, resulting in a lack of incentive to fuel our bodies. Hence, it is crucial to break this dietary ennui to attain longevity and triumph in a healthy eating plan.

Why not step out of your comfort zone by trying collard greens, asparagus, or kale? Discovering new and exquisite produce can simultaneously benefit your physical well-being. Leafy vegetables such as spinach, broccoli, and kale comprise vital vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients. A diverse selection of fresh, frozen, and canned varieties can assist in broadening your vegetable options, especially during the off-season. Fresh fruits and vegetables offer diverse flavors, shades, and textures that enable you to consume a spectrum of essential nutrients. For instance, yellow and orange produce typically have high beta-carotene content, while green leafy vegetables offer significant calcium and other critical nutrients. Incorporating bright yellow peppers or vivacious orange carrot slivers can enhance your plain green salad and elevate it to a more vibrant and nutritious level.

Several groups within modern society believe that vitamin and mineral supplements can rectify a poor diet. Despite the continued popularity of these products, it is imperative to recognize that whole foods contain numerous minerals, trace elements, and other micronutrients. Consequently, even the most comprehensive supplement cannot adequately substitute a well-balanced diet.

Vitamin and mineral supplements cost more and are less tasty than fruits and vegetables. When transitioning to a more health-conscious lifestyle, you must become well-informed about proper eating habits and determine the optimal fruits and vegetables for your palate. A balanced diet that you can sustain indefinitely is the most effective diet. Prioritizing the freshest fruits and vegetables enhances the taste, reduces expenses, and amplifies nutritional value. Opting for various in-season produce each week establishes the foundation for wholesome, diverse meals. Nevertheless, your preferred produce may not always be available, requiring the occasional substitution with canned and frozen alternatives. When selecting canned fruits, avoid those preserved in syrup and opt for those conserved in fruit juice or water, as they contain less sugar.

Incorporating fresh fruit, such as apple segments, mandarin oranges, nectarines, and the like, can elevate plain salads to newfound heights of flavor and interest. Combining fruits and vegetables optimizes nutritional benefits and provides an exciting culinary experience. So, start now and explore new vegetable and fruit produce and relish the advantages of a healthy and diverse diet.

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One way to create wonderful meals that are healthier than ever is to take a stroll through the produce section of your local grocery store.  Most major grocery store chains have huge produce sections, containing a wonderful variety of fruits and vegetables from all corners of the world.

Trying a variety of different fruits and vegetables is a great way to keep your meals interesting and exciting in addition to nutritious.  It is all too easy to become bored when trying to follow a healthy diet, and boredom can lead people to abandon their healthy habits.  Avoiding diet burnout is important to the long term survival of even the most sensible eating plan.

So if you’ve never had vegetables like collard greens, asparagus or kale before, why not give them a try.  Not only can trying new things allow you to make great new discoveries, but it can increase your level of fitness as well.  Leafy green vegetables like spinach, broccoli and kale are rich sources of many important vitamins, minerals and other micronutrients.

Another great way to increase the variety of vegetables you enjoy is to combine fresh, frozen and canned vegetables.  While fresh vegetables are generally better and healthier, frozen and canned vegetables can be great alternatives for when the fresh varieties are out of season.

One of the best things about fresh fruits and vegetables is the great variety of flavors, colors and textures available.  Eating a variety of different colored vegetables and fruits does much more than provide much needed variety.  It also provides a great variety of nutrients.  For instance, yellow and orange fruits and vegetables tend to be very high in beta carotene, while green leafy vegetables are often great sources of calcium and other important nutrients.  So why not spice up your plain old green salad with a splash of color in the form of yellow peppers or orange carrot slices?

Many people wrongly think that they can make up for a crappy diet by using vitamin and mineral supplements.  This mistaken belief is apparently very widespread, since sales of these supplements continue to break records. When considering vitamin and mineral supplements, however, it is important to remember that foods contain many different minerals, trace elements and other micronutrients.  That means that for every nutrient that has been discovered and synthesized, there may be ten, twenty or more of these micronutrients that have yet to be fully understood.  That is why no vitamin supplement, no matter how complete, can truly replace a healthy, balanced diet.

In addition, vitamin and mineral supplements are quite a bit more expensive than a good selection of vegetables and fruits, and not nearly as tasty. 

One of the best ways to start eating a healthy diet is to choose the freshest fruits and vegetables.  Not only do fresh fruits and vegetables taste better, but they are less expensive and more nutritious as well.  Choosing a variety of in season fruits and vegetables every week is a great way to enjoy healthy and varied meals.

Of course your favorite fruits and vegetables will not always be in season, so it will sometimes be necessary to supplement those fresh fruits and vegetables with canned and frozen varieties.  When choosing canned fruits, try to avoid those packed in syrup; choose canned fruits packed in fruit juice or water instead.  They will be healthier and contain less sugar.

Adding fresh fruit, such as apple slices, mandarin oranges, nectarines and the like is a great way to make plain salads more interesting and more delicious.  Combining fruits and vegetables is a great way to enhance your nutrition as well.

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Eating Too Much Sugar Causes Diabetes – Fact Or Fiction?

Like most diseases, there is plenty of fact and fiction and often the two become intertwined and diabetes is no exception. Most people think that eating too much sugar cause diabetes, this is not true.

Diabetes is not caused by eating sugar. Diabetes is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. However, eating a diet high in fat and sugar can cause you to become overweight.

It is being overweight that radically increases your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, so if you have a history of diabetes in your family, I would recommend a healthy diet and regular exercise.

Actually, I remember a story about an ex-patient of mine, let’s call her ‘Patricia’.

We spoke at length about all her risk factors, but she stopped me when I asked her if she had any relatives with diabetes. I couldn’t hold back the laughter, when she informed me that she wasn’t too worried as she didn’t like her relatives and had no contact with them!

Yo can catch diabetes from someone else – Fact or fiction?

This brings me nicely to another common myth about diabetes, that it can be passed from person to person by everyday contact (SOURCE: Diabetes UK). Although we don’t know exactly why some people get diabetes, we know that it is not contagious – it can’t be caught like a cold or flu. There seems to be some genetic link involved particularly Type 2 diabetes. But environmental factors also play a part.

That’s enough Diabetes Fiction now for some fact

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterised by abnormally high blood sugar levels due either to lower production of insulin or abnormal resistance to insulin’s effects.

The major symptoms are excessive thirst, frequent urination, muscle cramps, poor healing of wounds, impaired vision and itching.

Heart disease and stroke – caused by diseased coronary arteries supplying blood to brain- are also common complications associated with diabetes.

As people age, insulin production may diminish and/or insulin resistance may increase. If the consumption of food, especially food that causes rapid surges in blood sugar levels, remains high, blood sugar levels may become and remain abnormally high, which is the condition known as diabetes.

The serious consequences of this are collapse, a diabetic fit followed by diabetic coma and if not treated quickly, death can occur.

So diabetes is a killer disease!

Conventional and Complimentary treatments.

One problem with conventional treatments is that they are sometimes cumbersome and, on their own, not always effective. They sometimes have unwanted side-effects and very occasionally serious side-effects have been reported.

This is not to say that oral medication should not be used. On the contrary, they may be life-enhancing and life-saving and they should certainly never be stopped or their dose changed without a doctor’s advice.

But the need for them – and indeed the need eventually for insulin injections – will be greatly reduced with a few simple changes to lifestyle. One of the best things you could do is follow the methods of Doctor Patrick Quillin in his International bestselling book The Diabetes Improvement Program.

I’ve reviewed this book before and it stirred up quite a lot of interest, so I think it’s well worth another mention.

The author, Doctor Patrick Quillin, is renowned in this field and I’ve been impressed with his theses in the past. He uses food and supplements to slow and even reverse all aspects and symptoms of diabetes.

The programme helps to eliminate ketones and provides an abundance of energy. It normalises blood sugar levels, and improves both eyesight and balance. Scratches and scrapes heal much quicker. It will also renew feeling and sensation in numb limbs.

It reverses neuropathy and helps to heal ulcers. All these fantastic benefits have great knock-on effects as well. They help with blood pressure, lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels, reducing your risk of heart attack, stroke and kidney damage.

And for those of you that are quite handy around the kitchen, there is a second great book associated with the programme called the Diabetics Cookbook, that lists hundreds of great recipes from all around the world.

Due to the success of the Diabetes Improvement Program last time I mentioned it the publishers have agreed to supply my readers with both the Diabetes Improvement Program and the Diabetic Cookbook at a specially discounted rate. Basically, if you buy both books, you get the Cookbook for just a fiver! That’s half price and not a bad deal if you ask me. To read more about the Diabetes Improvement Program visit my website.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1847477

 

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Four Types Of Diabetes! Which Are You?

Results from the body’s failure to produce insulin, the hormone that unlocks the cells of the body, allowing glucose to enter and fuel them. It is estimated that 5-10% of Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 1 diabetes.

Having type 1 diabetes increases your risk for many serious complications. Some complications of type 1 diabetes include: heart disease (cardiovascular disease), blindness (retinopathy), nerve damage (neuropathy), and kidney …

Type 1 diabetes
Results from the body’s failure to produce insulin, the hormone that unlocks the cells of the body, allowing glucose to enter and fuel them. It is estimated that 5-10% of Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 1 diabetes.

Having type 1 diabetes increases your risk for many serious complications. Some complications of type 1 diabetes include: heart disease (cardiovascular disease), blindness (retinopathy), nerve damage (neuropathy), and kidney damage (nephropathy).

Type 2 diabetes
Results from insulin resistance (a condition in which the body fails to properly use insulin), combined with relative insulin deficiency. Most Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.

Having type 2 diabetes increases your risk for many serious complications. Some complications of type 2 diabetes include: heart disease (cardiovascular disease), blindness (retinopathy), nerve damage (neuropathy), and kidney damage (nephropathy). Learn more about these complications and how to cope with them.

Gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes affects about 4% of all pregnant women – about 135,000 cases in the United States each year.

Because gestational diabetes can hurt you and your baby, you need to start treatment quickly. Treatment for gestational diabetes aims to keep blood glucose levels equal to those of pregnant women who don’t have gestational diabetes. Treatment for gestational diabetes always includes special meal plans and scheduled physical activity. It may also include daily blood glucose testing and insulin injections. You will need help from your doctor, nurse educator, and other members of your health care team so that your treatment for gestational diabetes can be changed as needed.

For the mother-to-be, treatment for gestational diabetes helps lower the risk of a cesarean section birth that very large babies may require. Sticking with your treatment for gestational diabetes will give you a healthy pregnancy and birth, and may help your baby avoid future poor health. (see Diabetes Symptoms)

Pre-diabetes
Pre-diabetes is a condition that occurs when a person’s blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. There are 41 million Americans who have pre-diabetes, in addition to the 20.8 million with diabetes.

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Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes affects about four percent of all pregnant women although it is usually goes away after childbirth. Untreated gestational diabetes can lead to problems for both the mother and the child.

This type of diabetes is a temporary form of insulin resistance that usually occurs halfway through a pregnancy. It results from excessive hormone production in the body, or the inability of the pancreas make the additional insulin that is needed during pregnancy in women with no previous history of diabetes. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in the blood to high levels. This is called hyperglycemia.

Gestational diabetes affects about four percent of all pregnant women although it is usually goes away after childbirth. Untreated gestational diabetes can lead to problems for both the mother and the child. Although insulin does not cross through the placenta to the baby, sugar and other nutrients do.

Extra blood sugar goes through the placenta, giving the baby high blood sugar level. This causes the baby’s pancreas to produce extra insulin to get rid of the blood sugar, which can lead to microsomatia or a fat baby syndrome. Microsomatia develops because extra blood sugar and insulin cause the baby’s body to produce extra fat.

Babies with microsomatia are prone to other health problems including damage to their shoulders during birth. Because of the extra insulin newborns may have very low blood sugar levels at birth and may also have a higher risk of breathing problems.

The treatment of gestational diabetes should start quickly to prevent adverse effects to the mother and the baby. It should aim to keeping blood sugar level equal to those of pregnant women who do not have gestational diabetes. Treatment includes special meal plans and scheduled physical activity as well as daily blood sugar testing, so as to keep it under control.

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